Shropshire Cottages

Order by:

Less than 30 properties found matched your exact date search. So properties with availability close to your requirements have also been included.
just a moment loading data..

A number of locations have been found that match your search, please select from one of the following:


    Message Area

    Located adjacent and to the east of the Welsh border, the English county of Shropshire is one of the most rural and sparsely populated counties in England. Landlocked, it is also England’s largest inland county. The landscape is one of patchworked fields, wooded valleys, watery meres, bold escarpments and proud hill forts, together with elegant rolling hills, leading into the rugged Welsh mountains.

    Things to do in Shropshire
    The intricate network of canals and pathways that criss-cross the county include the Shropshire Union Canal and the Llangollen Canal. Over 46 miles of canals cover north Shropshire, taking in the towns of Ellesmere, Market Drayton and Whitchurch. At Lower Frankton, the Llangollen Canal is joined by the 35-mile long Montgomery Canal. As with other stretches of canal and waterway, the surrounding towpaths and watersides here act as unofficial nature reserves, encouraging all kinds of wildlife, whilst the route of the canals themselves not only attract narrowboat enthusiasts and canoeists, but also fishermen, walkers, cyclists and photographers.

    The Shropshire Hills also offer walkers some unparalleled vistas and countryside. Shrewsbury was awarded ‘cycling town’ status in 2008, together with substantial grant funding to further improve local cycling facilities. The Shropshire Way is a long-distance footpath which runs for almost 140 miles in a large loop around the county. To the west, Offas Dyke marks the ancient border with Wales, and is now a popular long-distance path strewn with the remains of the Marcher Castles.

    Top Destinations

    Shrewsbury - The county town, Shrewsbury, is noted for its particularly fine architecture, and a largely unaltered mediaeval street plan, which makes it a highly attractive destination for visitors. The River Severn is a key element in Shrewsbury, and the town has a total of nine bridges which cross the River Severn and sometimes the Rea Brook; two of the bridges - known respectively as the ‘English’ bridge and the ‘Welsh’ bridge - help to underline the extent to which the town has been the scene of many territorial conflicts over the years; the Welsh bridge covers a crossing point that has been utilised since the 12th century; on the bank close by, the dramatic and modern Darwin-dedicated ‘Quantum Leap’ sculpture has been designed to symbolize the scientist’s ground-breaking ideas and the impact of his work, and is an iconic structure which has been interpreted by many as representing part of a DNA double helix, although for others it also echoes the skeleton of a dinosaur. It was created to mark the bicentenary of the birth of the town’s most famous son in 2009. Meanwhile, to the west of the town, Rodney's Pillar, set on the top of Breidden Hill, a rocky outcrop on the east bank of the River Severn, commemorates an 18th century naval hero and his successful naval fleet, with many of the triumphant ships built in Bristol from local Montgomeryshire wood.

    Bridgnorth - With two distinctive areas – the ‘High Town’ and the ‘Low Town’ – joined by the steepest funicular railway in Britain, the now relatively quiet town of Bridgnorth was once a highly prosperous settlement – the Low Town, a thriving port on the banks of the River Severn, the High Town, the location of a fine castle, churches and elegant 16th and 17th century mansions. Today, the ruins of Bridgnorth Castle lean precariously, mainly due to damage inflicted to the walls during the English Civil War.

    Ludlow - Food is a central preoccupation in Ludlow; with speciality food shops, food fairs, markets and restaurants all over the town. This pretty market town is also home to almost 500 listed buildings, many of them mediaeval or Tudor half-timbered, and the mediaeval town walls here are also worthy of note.

    Caer Caradoc - This impressive 1,506 ft hill to the east of the Long Mynd dominates the local landscape and is the site of an ancient hill fort which is thought to have been the stronghold of a pre-Roman tribe. It is on the route of several popular local walks, which give panoramic views across south Shropshire.

    Much Wenlock - A quintessentially English town, Much Wenlock retains much of the feel of an ancient historic village. Nearby, Wenlock Edge is a distinctive geological feature, a limestone escarpment which runs for approximately 15 miles and is largely covered and protected by deciduous woodland.

    Oswestry - A ‘frontier town’ close to the Welsh border, its strategic position giving it an often turbulent history, Oswestry is now a bustling modern community. Today it offers visitors a fine mixture of historic buildings and architectural styles. Offa’s Dyke, the ancient earthwork and border with Wales, runs nearby to the west. Whittington Castle is another nearby attraction and is unique, being the only castle in the UK to be owned and managed by a community of local residents. Some legends link the castle to the stories associated with the Holy Grail.

    Ellesmere - A pretty market town with mediaeval streets and Georgian houses, Ellesmere takes its name from the Ancient Britons settlement on the edge of an amazing glacial mere. The Mere is the largest of some nine glacial meres in the area and is still seen as a key local leisure amenity, whether for boating, fishing or bird watching.

    Whitchurch - A bustling market town, founded by the Romans and now on the route of the Llangollen Canal and a superb flight of staircase locks, Whitchurch has some splendid historic buildings and a number of long-distance walking routes to help familiarise new visitors with some of the most important aspects of the local history.

    Telford and The Wrekin - The Wrekin is one of the most notable of all landmarks in the county, and can be seen from miles around, and across into the Black Country and Staffordshire. The hill rises to 1,113 ft above the Shropshire Plain, dominating the landscape around Telford and Ironbridge, and has as its origins an extinct volcanic hill. On a clear day, from the top of the Wrekin it is said that fifteen counties are visible. The lack of an accessible road route over the top of the hill means that everyone has to ‘go round the Wrekin’. Located not far from the Wrekin, Telford is the largest town in Shropshire; named after the renowned civil engineer Thomas Telford, it is one of the so-called ‘new towns’ built during the 1960s and 70s. 

    Ironbridge - Ironbridge Gorge is an UNESCO World Heritage Site, which encompasses Coalbrookdale and Ironbridge. Ironbridge itself is seen as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution some 300 years ago. In addition to being the site of the first ever cast iron bridge, Ironbridge is now home to a total of ten museums, which are spread along the banks of the River Severn, making it a quite unique place to visit, and an excellent excuse for a day out.

    Coalbrookdale - The second village in the Ironbridge Gorge, Coalbrookdale is also a place of great significance in the history of the Industrial Revolution – and specifically in relation to iron ore smelting, as it was here that easily-mined ‘coking coal’ was first used to produce a superior quality of iron. Home to the Ironbridge Institute, Coalbrookdale holds a unique place in the history of industrial development.

     


    Recently updated properties

    photo of Pultheley Farm , Hyssington, Shropshire, Bishops Castle
    Pultheley Farm nestles in delightful countryside with views over the rolling hills of Shropshire. This beautiful detached holiday property has been lavishly furnished throughout and is situated in the grounds of the ...
    Bedrooms: 1
    Sleeps Max: 2
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of St Vincent , Broome Chatwall, near Church Stretton, Shropshire
    Broome Farm, once a small arable farm, nestles in the heart of the Shropshire Hills in an AONB. St Vincent, a former granary and Bequia, a former carthouse have been sympathetically restored and carefully furnished to ...
    Bedrooms: 3
    Sleeps Max: 6
    Guide Price: £££
    Pets: pet friendly

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Havelock Cottage , Much Wenlock, Shropshire, Bridgnorth and Ironbridge
    Set on the edge of one of Shropshire’s most quintessentially English towns, this well-presented, detached, limestone holiday cottage has been furnished to a high standard throughout. With off road parking, the property ...
    Bedrooms: 3
    Sleeps Max: 5
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Lime Lodge , Clun, near Clunton, Shropshire, Bishops Castle
    Lime Lodge is situated on the outskirts of the pretty village of Clunton and nestled within the Shropshire Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. This detached holiday lodge is set on the popular Clun Valley Lodges ...
    Bedrooms: 2
    Sleeps Max: 4
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Oak Barn Cottage , Trefonen, near Oswestry, Shropshire
    This 18th-century, stone-built, mid-terrace barn conversion is set within a courtyard in a rural location overlooking the beautiful Tanat Valley and Offa’s Dyke Pathway. The shared garden and 20 acres are perfect for ...
    Bedrooms: 2
    Sleeps Max: 4
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of The Granary , Newton-on-the-Hill, near Shrewsbury, Shropshire
    This finely converted, semi-detached former barn is set in the grounds of a Georgian farmhouse, Hill Farm, in the quiet hamlet of Newton-on-the-Hill, a mid point between Shrewsbury, Wem and Ellesmere. The conversion has ...
    Bedrooms: 4
    Sleeps Max: 7
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of The Gatehouse , Upton Cressett, near Bridgnorth, Shropshire, Bridgnorth and Ironbridge
    These two award-winning, period, historic properties have been given the highest luxury ranking by Shropshire Tourism and are situated in the grounds of Grade I listed Upton Cressett Hall, in the sleepy hamlet of Upton ...
    Bedrooms: 2
    Sleeps Max: 4
    Guide Price: £££

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Little Brampton , Clunbury, near Ludlow, Shropshire, Craven Arms
    Ground floor: Living room. Dining room. Kitchen. Games room. Cinema/conference room. 2 double bedrooms, one with en-suite shower room with toilet, one with en-suite wet room and toilet. First floor: 6 double bedrooms, one ...
    Bedrooms: 11
    Sleeps Max: 32
    Guide Price: £££
    Pets: dog friendly

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Tree House Barn , Pitchford, near Shrewsbury, Shropshire
    Peacefully situated within the extensive grounds of the Pitchford Estate, these four properties offer superb holiday accommodation. The Generals’ Quarters (UKC2646) is named after a previous owners of the hall, General ...
    Bedrooms: 2
    Sleeps Max: 4
    Guide Price: £££
    Pets: pets allowed

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     

    photo of Marsh Down Farm Cottage , Hopton Wafers, near Ludlow, Shropshire
    Marsh Down Farm Cottage is a lovely family property tucked away in rural Shropshire with the most fantastic views, is adjacent to the owner’s home. Guests can enjoy stargazing the night sky in peace and tranquillity. The ...
    Bedrooms: 2
    Sleeps Max: 4
    Guide Price: £££
    Pets: dog friendly

    Shortlist: * add to shortlist

    More Information

     





    Latest Shropshire holiday property reviews